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Details: Category: Cycling | Published: 30 October 2014 | Created: 26 November 2014 | Hits: 3008

Dr. Jim Taylor is a leading high performance Sports Psychologist. He was recently interviewed by Achieve Training and Coaching for their blog. I have been hearly alot lately how it is the "off-season". Somehow, this means, the training regiment is stopped, and just riding around begins or worse: nothing. We all need a short break, but if we wait too long, fitness drops. This has been my experience the last two winters. I stopped any real training in the fall when I went to York University to take courses, and by the time January came along, I was back to build again...only to discover a general lack of race readiness until about June in the summer - you know, when race season is about over.

From the arcticle, I love this statement:

"ED: As a sports psychologist, how do you approach the off-season with your athletes?

JT: I am a firm believer that next season starts now. After a few weeks recovery its time to get back in the game. But it’s more than just going out a riding a whole bunch."

This is the same mentality put forth by Ed Veal and the Real Deal Performance team. There isn't really an off-season. I took a 2.5 week recovery break in September, but I intend to be ready to race for Track Nationals in January and for racing on the road in Florida in March and Georgia in April. Too long of a break, and your fitness will drop.

Check out the article HERE.